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What helps and what hinders in early cognitive behaviour therapy interactions

What we are doing:

We have developed a tool which enables the rating of psychological therapy interaction on the basis of patient activation – an individual’s confidence and perceived ability to manage their own health.

We aim to see if initial interactions in psychological therapy predict long-term health and quality of life. If so, which particular types of interaction are especially important.

Why we are doing it: 

Although CBT is evidenced as an effective treatment for a number of major health problems, several people do not benefit from it. Part of the reason for this is the big variation in the helpfulness of different CBT therapists. 

Early dropout from CBT is another important factor limiting the effectiveness of CBT.

Therefore, we want to understand how very early interactions might affect eventual clinical outcomes. Particularly, when the biggest benefits of CBT come in the earliest session.

This will help to train CBT therapists to recognise interaction styles and types that are particularly helpful, or hindering, during early engagement. Longer-term this aims to improve the effectiveness of CBT and other psychological therapies.

What the benefits will be:

This informs the training of CBT therapists, by helping them to recognise interaction styles and types that are particularly helpful, or hindering, during early engagement. Longer-term this aims to improve the effectiveness of CBT and other psychological therapies.

Who we are working with:

  • University of Nottingham, School of Medicine

Contact:

Sam Malins, sam.malins@nottingham.ac.uk