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Addressing participation needs for CYP with acquired brain injuries

Development of an intervention to identify and address long-term participation needs of children and young people with acquired brain injuries and their families 

What we are doing?

This study aims to identify the longer-term participation needs of children and young people with acquired brain injuries (CYP-ABI) and their families and develop an intervention to address them. The participation needs of CYP-ABI and their families from one geographical region will be explored from multiple perspectives. Using mixed methods (survey, interviews, focus groups) evidence of the participation and quality of life outcomes and needs will be gathered and facilitators and barriers to participation identified. An intervention logic model aimed at identifying and addressing needs will be developed and it’s feasibility tested.  

Why we are doing it?

CYP-ABI are known to experience physical, cognitive, emotional and behavioural sequelae which can be long-lasting or become more evident months and years after the even as developmental, education and social demands increase. Participation in activities at home, school and in the community is known to be restricted in CYP-ABI, however, little UK research has been completed exploring this or interventions to address it.

What the benefits will be and to whom?

This study will add to the evidence base regarding participation and quality of life outcomes and needs for CYP-ABI and their families. The development of an intervention aimed at addressing these needs that will be ready for implementation, will inform clinical practice and directly benefit the CYP and their families. 

Who we are working with?

CYP-ABI and their parents have been involved in the direction and design of this study and will continue to provide PPI feedback throughout the course of the study. Close liaison with the BRILL team who provide rehabilitation and ongoing support for all CYP admitted to Nottingham Children’s Hospital with an ABI. Consultation with healthcare, education and social care professionals is included within this study. 

Contact

Rachel Keetley, ARC/UoN PhD Student, Division of Rehabilitation, Ageing and Wellbeing, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Rachel.keetley@nottingham.ac.uk.